It might be worth your cash to buy organic

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…If you eat non-organic foods, you are eating pesticides. The evidence is in your pee.

With a Seabreeze Organic Farm delivery subscription, your produce will always be pesticide-free.

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To prove that point, Swedish grocery chain Coop Svierge AB took a family of five off of conventional products and stocked their kitchen with solely organic food. Researchers took urine samples both before and after the switch and documented in the study.

The independent research group that conducted the study at the grocer’s request found that concentrations of pesticide residues decreased on average by a factor of 6.7 when the five family members consistently ate organic food. Children, in particular, had the lower concentrations in their urine after the organic food consumption period. For the adults, not all pesticide levels fell, but most did.

A 2014 study published in the journal Environmental Research also found a decrease in pesticide levels in urine samples from 13 Australian adults who switched to organic food. (Although the researchers noted, “larger scale studies in different populations are required to confirm these findings.”)

The writing on the bathroom wall

Pesticides are present in non-organic food and much less so in organic products. But the more important question, of course, is whether that matters for human health.

That question, however, is a bit complicated. For one, people who buy organic food also smoke less, eat more fruits and vegetables, and exercise more, so a simple population study won’t quite do the trick.

Fruit flies don’t have the same problem

In 2013, high school wunderkind Ria Chhabra made headlines by putting fruit flies on organic and non-organic diets. Her research, published in a peer-reviewed journal with the teenager as first author, found greater stress resilience, fertility, and longevity in the organic-fed fruit flies.

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